New TV. The New World,New Edition.

Well, I have finally bought a new TV, thank God! I’ve been searching for half a year and gather I must have studied every Audiovisual forum known to more or less civilized languages. I couldn’t be happier with my final choice, a Sony LCD that sports better picture quality than sets costing the double of my new friend. Most people seem to want ultra-thin sets, and this is where their money goes. Me, I couldn’t care less whether my set is 3 or 10 centimetres deep, as long as the TV doesn’t turn David Lean into Aaron Spelling.


Anyhow… The first two Bluray films we saw on this 7th wonder of the world, were Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and The New World. Best to feed the TV some quality films, so it doesn’t pick up bad habits or thinks it can just begin to slack off! I think this was the third or fourth time I watched The New World, and this time in its Extended Edition.

While often just a marketing ploy, in the case of this film, I have to say the extra minutes – each 41 of them – contributed positively to an already very, very good film. Whereas before actions and motivations had to be surmised or guessed at, I felt that with its new running time of almost 3 hours, the film seemed a fuller and even more immersive experience. The director, Terrence Malick, never one to leave the technical aspects of his films to chance, re-edited the film and oversaw every nuance of colour and sound in the new high-def mastering. Do yourself a favour and seek out the new version if you have the means. That last long shot of the tree broke something inside of me. In a good way. If you have paid attention and are not a stranger to yourself, it will break something inside you as well. In a good way.

Perhaps it is fitting, then, that Malick’s new film is called Tree of Life. It was almost premiering this year in Cannes, but Malick decided last minute that he needed more time with it. This can, of course, mean anything from a couple of weeks more to a couple of years. Malick has only made four films, all of them masterpieces. Needless to say, I’m awaiting Tree of Life with baited breath and a slight fear that perhaps this time I will be disappointed. I never am, though. No, sir. I never am.

Incidentally, while watching Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, it struck me that Snow White never calls her male companions dwarfs, rather Little Men. Political correctness in 1937?  The film itself has no qualms about calling them dwarfs, both in the narration and in its title…

Speaking of BluRays. One of the companies that has not immediately begun to flood the marked with more or less high definition editions of their back catalogue, is Studio Ghibli. Most expected that with the release on BluRay of the studio’s latest film, Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea, the rest of the companies’ titles would follow suit. This hasn’t happened. Disney, who owns the Western distribution rights to Ghibli, has been in frequent contact with the company, requesting titles for the BluRay market. Ghibli, however, seem to take their time, hopefully because they want to protect their many masterpieces from fast and shoddy releases.

Former president of the company and leading producer, Toshio Suzuki, said that he suggested Ghibli’s break through film, Nausicaa, for the Blu Ray treatment, but sensed hesitation from the Disney side, who evidently wanted more commercially viable releases. Still, Suzuki has continued to digitalize Nausicaa, deciding to clean up the original print, but still taking care not to make it more clean than the original once was. Director Hayao Miyazaki only demanded that they not change the imperfections of the film: A film is an element of its time, it grows old like everything else, and perhaps herein lies its value. Any imperfections are signs of the process, and has as big a place in the history of the product as anything else. No artificiality!, the old master demanded. After having seen the near finished result, he only wanted they stress a bit more green in the colour spectrum. George Lucas and Steven Spielberg could learn a thing or two…

Suzuki ends the interview with this: “Okui-san came (to) my room (the) next day (after the screening). He said “Miyazaki-san cried, didn’t he?” I answered in this way, “Nausicaa is not yet over.” Both I and Miya-san remember all of the events and every cut“.

Nausicaa is supposed to be released on Blu Ray in Japan one of these days. As for when it and other Ghibli films will reach “the West”, we have to wait and see. Amazon has put some titles on its web pages without suggesting any date.

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